Author Topic: RIP  (Read 720 times)

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Offline Janaru

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RIP
« on: January 31, 2017, 12:16:04 PM »
John Hurt! Another wonderful actor gone. ;( I\'ve enjoyed every performance I\'ve ever seen.

We also lost Mary Tyler Moore, recently, though I don\'t know if her shows made it across the pond. She was wonderful, and will be greatly missed.
Note to self:  Use your powers for good, not for evil.....

Offline Truthyness

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Re: RIP
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2017, 03:20:22 PM »
Gosh MTM! Hours of fun and entertainment from her. God speed!

Hurt is a sad loss indeed.

A commitment to Mod\'nAdminlyness: I understand that  r-e-s-i-s-t-a-n-c-e  *i - s*    f-u-t-i-l-e.
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Offline TallforaDuck

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Re: RIP
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2017, 08:08:21 AM »
Just seen this, I too fondly remember MTM The Dick Van Dyke Show is one of my oldest fond memories as a lad, her own show was less available over here, but sadly, I don't think over here, that people quite understood how revolutionary she was in getting Women taken seriously as programme makers, the same could be said of Lucille Ball who, whilst I didn't find funny or enjoy, I had tremendous admiration for in the same way.

As well as her own shows and spin off (Rhoda and Phyliss for example) Bob Newhart Show, Betty White Show were also MTM productions as were two of my all time favourites, Lou Grant and Hill Street Blues, land mark shows both.

St Elsewhere and WKRP Cinncinnatti were also MTM show that are hailed these days, but I was less fond of those.

A real pioneer was MTM, a formidable Lady and in her hey day, although less relelvant, rather pretty.

RIP.
'Anima Mea' -My Soul

Offline Ironeyes

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Re: RIP
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2017, 09:23:24 AM »
... although less relelvant, rather pretty. RIP.

Very relevant to this young fellow in those days. I religiously watched the MTM show for it's ability to make me laugh whilst giving me glorious close-ups of one of the loveliest faces on tv. Strange that you should mention Lucille Ball, as I loved her I Love Lucy show. She was brilliantly funny at the time and looking back, I think that I appreciated only the humour, then, some years later while watching some clips on YouTube, it dawned on me just how damned attractive she was as well.   

Offline TallforaDuck

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Re: RIP
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2017, 11:11:17 AM »
Interesting you say that, I also realised many years after Lucille had gone, whilst looking at some pictures of her and her with her husband Desi, what a really attractive couple they were.

I never found her funny, but my parents watched it, I remember well Gale Gordon as Mr Mooney, 'Here's Lucy' I think.

Her voice really grated with me and I never much liked slapstick comedy in the 'Talkie' era.

Like MTM she was responsible with her production company for some iconic shows and was possibly the first and most important 'Iconic Woman' of television, Star Trek and Mission Impossible being probably the most high profile.

I may not have enjoyed her as a performer, but I certainly admired her achievements.
'Anima Mea' -My Soul

Offline Truthyness

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Re: RIP
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2017, 12:29:55 AM »
Either I'm easily influenced or you are just plain right about Lucille TF!
My family watched it faithfully and when we kids were home from boarding school, we did too.
There was little choice then, and we were glad to be away from school.
Through the fog of ages, I guess I thought I liked it, then, reading your post, the veils fell from my eyes, it was loud, clumsy, repetitive and the sound of that taped laughter - ugh - it rings in my ears still now!

 

A commitment to Mod\'nAdminlyness: I understand that  r-e-s-i-s-t-a-n-c-e  *i - s*    f-u-t-i-l-e.
I shall not be starc

Offline Lady Penelope

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Re: RIP
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2017, 06:18:39 PM »
It is a matter of age, I think.  When I was a teenager I thought I Love Lucy was terribly funny and sophisticated.   Watching a repeat on u  tube a few months ago , I found it rather childish and banal.      I am not sure if it is my age or that the World has become less innocent and more critical  :-\

Offline TallforaDuck

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Re: RIP
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2017, 07:32:49 PM »
I have thought about this a fair bit recently as I seem to get more and more disconnected from what is popularly considered funny these days.

 It's obvious our age can play a part, but your second point about the world less innocent may have a lot to do with this.

I used to argue with my Mother in Law quite a lot regarding humour, I can be rude and even mildly obscene, I find tasteless humour funny at times BUT it needs to have thought put into it, swearing and smut are not in and of themselves funny.

Reading that back I can't help but find myself becoming a little po-faced about it.

As an example, I loved Father Ted when it came out, it's irreverent, tactless, tasteless at times,  often juvenile, but it made me laugh.

I watch it occasionally now these days and though I have a warm feeling towards it, it hasn't stood the test of time for me, Fawlty Towers is another, I admire and acknowledge how clever and well played it was yet it no longer makes me laugh.

I have dug out the DVD of Dinnerladies and we are rewatching again and despite knowing the dialogue, it's brilliantly delivered and I still laugh out loud... exactly the same happens when I listen to Cabin Pressure.

It seems as if there genuinely is an expiry date on a lot of comedy, stuff Like Dads Army, Open all Hours were never laugh out loud funny they were gentle and amusing instead, they seem to bear up better as do the genuinely clever stuff like Frasier or Yes Minister the word play in them is and always will be a source of amusement.

In truth, you could make a case that what I've typed is a meandering mess and that the passing years dull or change your humour, sort of erosion of the funny bone, so maybe it is age, just from a slightly different perspective.

I've not helped have I? :-\
'Anima Mea' -My Soul

Offline Ironeyes

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Re: RIP
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2017, 08:48:32 PM »
Blimey!

Welcome back Lady P, it's been far too long and I've missed you.

On more than one occasion in the past month, I considered sending Truthy a pm to ask whether we were likely to hear from you again. In the end, it wasn't necessary.

Hope you're well.

Offline Ironeyes

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Re: RIP
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2017, 09:32:12 PM »
I think it's very much to do with age. Psychologists say that a lot of the music we hear in our teens tends to stick (and be appreciated for ever) because our brains are undergoing great neurological changes over those years.

Surely in the same way, tv programmes and films experienced at that age can also remain in our affection, even though later productions may be superior in every sense, and we may now value those later productions more than the earlier material.

The key is what made us happy when we were changing from children into adults.

Looking back, what I never forget is that whatever I laughed at and was entertained by when I was growing up, was the best available at the time (or so I thought), but I certainly wouldn't expect to have the same reaction towards it now. When I do though, it's magic.

Offline Lady Penelope

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Re: RIP
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2017, 09:36:30 PM »
Thank you so much Ironeyes .  I have missed you all too, though I have kept in touch with Tru and Jan,  and it is good to be back.  I have not been well and have had a few other problems, but hopefully I am stable now.  I am still finding my way round the new format, so be patient with me!

Yes I think I folow you Tallforaduck.   I think one of the words I was looking at with regard to aging was "cynical".

I like risque humour  but hate vulgarity, and I dont usually  like cruel humour or banana skin type.   I agree entirely with you about Dads Army, although with me that was the other way round, I didnt "get" it at first when I was a teenager but I appreciate the gentle humour now.
And yes "YesMinister" is a real classic and still so true today!  Other Golden Oldie gentle commedies star my namesake:  The Good Life and tTo the Manor Born.


Offline Truthyness

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Re: RIP
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2017, 01:34:50 AM »
Bien venue de retour Dear Lady P,
Great reading you. Sorry to hear about the health.

An unusual event: I agree with all three of you about changing attitudes towards humour, though ANYONE DARING TO DISS DAD'S ARMY is ON NOTICE!

As I tune in to the enth repeats of the legendary series I am left in wonder, it is every bit as good (if not better) and I've said it before, as Will the great bard's work, or Mozart. I CANNOT be without it for long periods and CANNOT watch it on TV! On radio it becomes a powerful anti-depressant.

Radio is sanity, this Saturday for the first time ever, I found NOTHING to listen to, and felt bereft.

Look forward to seeing more from ya Lady P.
Cheers Y'all.

A commitment to Mod\'nAdminlyness: I understand that  r-e-s-i-s-t-a-n-c-e  *i - s*    f-u-t-i-l-e.
I shall not be starc

Offline TallforaDuck

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Re: RIP
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2017, 08:36:51 AM »
I think it's very much to do with age. Psychologists say that a lot of the music we hear in our teens tends to stick (and be appreciated for ever) because our brains are undergoing great neurological changes over those years.

Surely in the same way, tv programmes and films experienced at that age can also remain in our affection, even though later productions may be superior in every sense, and we may now value those later productions more than the earlier material.

The key is what made us happy when we were changing from children into adults.

Looking back, what I never forget is that whatever I laughed at and was entertained by when I was growing up, was the best available at the time (or so I thought), but I certainly wouldn't expect to have the same reaction towards it now. When I do though, it's magic.

That's possibly a more articulate version of what I was trying to say and I agree with just about all of it.
'Anima Mea' -My Soul

Offline TallforaDuck

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Re: RIP
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2017, 09:34:16 AM »


I like risque humour  but hate vulgarity, and I dont usually  like cruel humour or banana skin type.   I agree entirely with you about Dads Army, although with me that was the other way round, I didnt "get" it at first when I was a teenager but I appreciate the gentle humour now.
And yes "YesMinister" is a real classic and still so true today!  Other Golden Oldie gentle commedies star my namesake:  The Good Life and tTo the Manor Born.



May I as a recent interloper also  welcome you back and hope you're able to control your health issues and not have them control you.

I am in agreement with you regarding cruel or banana skin humour I enjoyed as a kid when Bob Monkhouse used to present silent movies visual slapstick was acceptable, obviously but with 'talkies' you deserve a better input from the makers... sadly Laurel & Hardy rarely make it to our screens these days but their early stuff still makes me laugh and is the perfect combination.

As Ironeyes says when stuff from your youth still does it it's magical.

I remember well, watching with my parents the first series of 'Last of the Summer Wine', it was billed and presented as the first comedy specifically featuring older people. As a relative youth, I actually found it amusing and enlightening and the realisation that older folks both had problems and could be amusing was a revealation.

It's longevity led it to become a pantomime, parody and farce, but as it descended in quality to my eyes, I learned not to be to harsh on it, as at regular intervals an actor who I had liked in a previous film or programme would turn up and it was like a place for older 'stars' or character actors to ply their trade, I liked this as it felt like they would stay 'relevant' into their dotage.

I am with you regarding Dads Army, I never found it funny, amusing yes, but not funny,, HOWEVER it was always likeable a great cast and maybe the best show ever to highlight how we as a nation really don't take ourselves to seriously whilst still being good at what's important.

The shows such as The Good Life and To the Manor Born, dismissed as middle class and twee by the 'Alternative' generation of comedians are still shown and are better appreciated now, whereas the supposed 'Superstars' of that time The Young Ones, Five go Mad, Bottom and so on look horrendously dated and childish... something of a delicious irony and I say that whilst enjoying them at the time the old saying Style is fleeting but Class is eternal pretty much applies.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 09:42:21 AM by TallforaDuck »
'Anima Mea' -My Soul

Offline TallforaDuck

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Re: RIP
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2017, 09:44:46 AM »
Bien venue de retour Dear Lady P,


Radio is sanity, this Saturday for the first time ever, I found NOTHING to listen to, and felt bereft.

Look forward to seeing more from ya Lady P.
Cheers Y'all.

If I can help ease your void Tru, give me a pm as I have an idea.
'Anima Mea' -My Soul